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Burial - Untrue download album

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Burial - Untrue download album
Abstract, UK Garage, Dubstep, Ambient, Bass Music
  • Performer:
    Burial
  • Title:
    Untrue
  • Genre:
  • Style:
    Abstract, UK Garage, Dubstep, Ambient, Bass Music
  • Date of release:
  • Country:
  • Size FLAC version
    1376 megabytes
  • Size MP3 version
    1839 megabytes
  • Size WMA version
    1404 megabytes
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    720
  • Formats:
    TTA APE AC3 MP2 AHX MOD AAC

Untrue is the second studio album by British electronic music producer Burial. Untrue builds on the general atmosphere of his debut album Burial (2006), marking a development in Burial's sound through its more prominent usage of pitch-shifted and time-stretched vocal samples.

Untrue is the second album for Burial, a London-based anonymous dubstep artist. Untrue is complex, stark, tender, blurred and breathtaking. Burial has managed the impossible and improved on his faultless debut. Released by Hyperdub. Writers Burial, Fred Jerkins III, LaShawn Daniels & 2 more.

The critical success of Burial's self-titled first album threatened to derail the project's mystery, however. A collection of tunes recorded at home on a low-tech setup over the course of many years, Burial- moody, brooding, by turns supple and sullen- shot to the top of many critics' best-of lists last year. But Untrue maintains the style and the vibe of the first album and yet does it better. It's a deeper album- richer, more complex, more enveloping. The irony is that almost nothing has changed.

Untrue is the second album by the ut-now-unmasked dubstep producer known as Burial. The album received a large amount of praise from many publications: It was named the best album of 2007 by Sputnikmusic, the 2nd best by The Wire, the 8th by Tiny Mix Tapes, and 10th by Pitchfork Media.

Burial Untrue скачать mp3 в хорошем качестве, либо слушайте песню Burial - Untrue, Burial Untrue - In McDonalds, Burial - Archangel UK Garage, Burial - Untrue, Burial Untrue 2007 - Endorphin, а также рингтоны на звонок и все новые треки.

Burial - Untrue 2006 was the year that dubstep finally broke and Burial’s eponymous debut rightly rode the crest of the wave. Now the reclusive south London producer returns with his follow up album, Untrue, which lays another strong claim to Burial being the most innovative and expressive artist not only in dubstep, but in the whole of electronic music. Untrue works the same template as Burial, built around ghostly spoken samples, two-step shuffles and downbeat ambient interludes

Tracklist

Archangel 3:57
Near Dark 3:52
Homeless 5:20
Shell Of Light 4:39
Raver 4:57
Etched Headplate 5:58
Untrue 6:15
UK 1:41
Endorphin 2:58

Versions

Category Artist Title (Format) Label Category Country Year
HDBLP002 Burial Untrue ‎(2x12", Album) Hyperdub HDBLP002 UK 2007
HDBCD002 Burial Untrue ‎(13xFile, MP3, Album, 320) Hyperdub HDBCD002 UK 2007
HDBCD002 Burial Untrue ‎(13xFile, WAV, Album) Hyperdub HDBCD002 UK 2007
HDBLP002 Burial Untrue ‎(2x12", Album) Hyperdub HDBLP002 UK 2007
HDBLP002 Burial Untrue ‎(2x12", Album) Hyperdub HDBLP002 UK 2007
HDBLP002 Burial Untrue ‎(2x12", Album, M/Print) Hyperdub HDBLP002 UK 2007
HDBLP002 Burial Untrue ‎(2x12", Album, M/Print) Hyperdub HDBLP002 UK 2007
HDBLP002 Burial Untrue ‎(2x12", Album, MP) Hyperdub HDBLP002 UK 2007
OTCD-2160 Burial Untrue ‎(CD, Album) Octave OTCD-2160 Japan 2007
HDBCD002 Burial Untrue ‎(CD, Album) Hyperdub HDBCD002 UK 2007
HDBCD002 Burial Untrue ‎(CD, Album) Hyperdub HDBCD002 UK 2007
HDBCD002 Burial Untrue ‎(CD, Album, Promo) Hyperdub HDBCD002 UK 2007
HDBCD002 Burial Untrue ‎(CD, Album, Unofficial, Dig) Hyperdub , Cargo Records HDBCD002 Russia 2007
HDBCD002 Burial Untrue ‎(CDr, Album, Promo) Hyperdub HDBCD002 UK 2007
BRC-322, HDBCD002 Burial Untrue ‎(CD, Album, RE) Beat Records, Hyperdub BRC-322, HDBCD002 Japan 2012
HDBLP002 Burial Untrue ‎(2x12", Album, RP) Hyperdub HDBLP002 UK 2014
HDBCD002D Burial Untrue ‎(13xFile, FLAC, Album, RE) Hyperdub HDBCD002D 2016
HDBLP002 Burial Untrue ‎(2x12", Album, RE) Hyperdub HDBLP002 UK 2016
HDBLP002 Burial Untrue ‎(2x12", Album) Hyperdub HDBLP002 UK Unknown



Lahorns Gods
Repress is up on redeye and various other sites.. ya dig
Gavinrage
A melancholic soundtrack to urban landscapes in november evenings. The deliberate roughness and imperfections of the production make this album sound warm, personal and sincere.In my mind I often pair "Untrue" with FSOL's "Dead Cities", which is quite different in style, but perfectly complementary.
Bradeya
Glad I bought this record. Both the vinyl itself and the music on it are superb. The record is heavyweight, packed in a great sleeve and of course carries the best Dubstep/Garage-music my ears have ever had the pleasure of listening to. 5/5
Ytli
hopefully i'm not the only who will appreciate a cassette release
Ceroelyu
Anyone here got their hands on the screen print given with the first 50 copies sold?
Priotian
Excellent pressing. I echo Doomguy-id's sentiments, definitely buy it through Bandcamp.
Raniconne
Download code gets you a 320kbs MP3 copy. Only redeemable once.Also worth noting, these were shrinkwrapped too tight so there's varying amount of damage to the jacket, perhaps they'll rectify that with future copies.
Brakora
Burial is a UK Garage cum Dubstep music, signed to Hyperdub record label, where the record label saw two top class critically album released one after the another. First was his self – titled album – Burial and next – Untrue.Self – Titled was the precursor for Untrue album. Elements of 2 step, UK Garage, Ambient and Dubstep used in self-titled were retained in Untrue, but obviously were experimented, juxtaposed with complimentary vocals, airy cum atmospheric vibes and burial styled drums, which gave a distinct and peculiar sound to Untrue.The album has a lot of replaybility. One might after listening to it, get the vibes of R&B music. Highly Recommended!
FailCrew
Burials best album , the atmospherics are more advanced and in another league to his previous releases , why the critics rave about them i have no idea , this is easily his more engaging work , this is an album that connects to your soul , This album is one of the best atmospheric albums of all time, a masterpiece that invokes the mind on journeys of emotional extremes
Jaberini
I love Burial better but still a record to remember. This release has all the tracks and plays as it should. Enjoy!
Joony
Perfect ambience. This album either speaks to you or it doesn't. If you are a night owl, spending time at night thinking, remembering... this might be up your alley. Introspective, intentionally imperfect garage - romantic and depressing.
Landaron
Remember guys, this is available on bandcamp. Not only does the artist get a bigger share that way but it was the cheapest price I could find online (particularly because bandcamp's shipping costs are very competitive).
Kigabar
Burial manages to keep hold of your attention through the whole album even though there is no real climax. After you're done listening you will find yourself contemplating life and questioning your life decisions. The wide range of emotions going through your mind while listening this album are both fascinating and confronting. The artwork is great as well, really adding to the dark, mysterious vibe of the album. In my opinion the only downside is that the 2x12" does not include some of the shorter compositions as "Untitled", "Ghost Hardware", "In McDonalds" and "Dog Shelter" which are included on the CD.Edit: Dang, forgot to mention there is a 2016 Reprint available which include the "missing" tracks.
Malojurus
If there was a pirate radio station broadcasting from a haunted submarine, this is what it would sound like.I heart Burial.
KiddenDan
This is an ESSENTIAL reissue if only for the inclusion of the ambient tracks. They're a surprisingly a big part of why "Untrue" is a stone-cold classic and basically perfect album, and you don't appreciate them as much until they're missing, as they were on the first pressing. Their absence on the first vinyl pressing seriously messed with the album's flow-- it seemed more like a DJ-geared collection of top-shelf Burial tracks than an all-time masterpiece.I'm listening to this pressing now, and it's absolutely fantastic. The vinyl is seriously heavy-- I could be crazy but it seems heavier than some other 180g releases I own. The sound is perfectly on-point, so a big gold star to whoever oversaw this reissue.Now we can finally get the complete "Untrue" experience in its full glory on vinyl. Big up Hyperdub!!!
Mash
Sucks that I bought an older pressing (w/o ghost hardware) thinking they would never press the whole album. This is why I dont settle/splurge with physical media anymore, everything but the most obscure shit eventually gets a proper re-release.
Maldarbaq
I think they call it sods law. You are annoyed that they reissued after you had bought it. Just sell the original and buy the reissue if you are that bothered.
Togar
9 years later... It really wasn't an incomplete product, it was the vinyl version of the album- its not unusual to leave tunes off a vinyl press of an album (often because those missing are released as singles) and so... we bought the singles (with the B sides).
Virn
i think having the original pressing has its pluses, the tunes not so packed on the wax. There is reason for singles and what a joy for us-- Ghost Hardware, a 5 minute song on a 12" spinning at 45, well there you go nothing sounds better than that...
luisRED
What do you mean? I was just saying I wish I would have waited since ghost hardware is my fav track on the album (and thought it was included when I bought it) but instead I settled for an incomplete product, which I've learned not to do anymore. Where does money come into the equation? I'll probably just get the old OOP ghost hardware single anyway since that has some good exclusive tracks.
Use_Death
So, are you innit for the money or the music?
Dynen
lovely stack of wax. thick, heavy and was delivered post haste a soon as i spotted the re-press. I wasn't going to let them prices rise to ridiculous levels this time.
Auau
Pretty disappointed in how I received this. It shipped from UK in a flimsy cardboard container so that when I received it, the spine was damaged as well as the top and bottom seam. The record inside had already busted through the cheap paper sleeve. I contacted Hyperdub and haven't heard a word.
Saithinin
Yeah I wasn't particularly impressed with how mine was packed either, there was a bit too much room in the parcel so the record slid around a bit in shipping and the top seam suffered some damage on mine. However, I contacted Hyperdub and they apologized, said they'd have a word to the packer, and gave me a 40% off on my next order which I'm going to use on the self titled reissue which I was planning on buying anyway. Ends up being a bigger saving for me than the partial refund I wanted. I will definitely ask them to ship the records outside of the jacket when I make that next order, though.
Zahisan
(as most the world settles to stream it on their phone via spottily)
Геракл
I hear you man. I don't like when labels try to cheap out product to maximize profit. This was not the release for them to do that. The thing with putting out heavy weight vinyl is that you have to commit all the way. Like you can't expect that some shitty, flimsy jacket is going to hold up well with 2 slabs of 180gr. vinyl in them. It's tricky to keep those jackets in good condition. It's like you breath on it and the jacket gets a crease. Best thing to do is ask seller to kindly unseal and ship with the records outside of the jacket. That usually saves a lot of hassle.
Juce
Paypal claim. I agree I wasnt over impressed with the packaging although mine was ok. Its a tricky one, while its nice to support a label I do think they need to use better or atleast a bit more packaging. I'd return it and purchase from a shop.
Legionstatic
Finally this classic gets the vinyl treatment it deserves. Track listing is correct and songs like 'Dog Shelter', 'In Macdonalds' and 'Ghost Hardware', so essential to the LPs flow are back. Unlike a number of the EPs (such as Kindred) the sound quality is warm, clear and crisp. Crackles sound like part of the music, as they should, and not a vinyl defect. An essential purchase. Spin it on a dark, rainy night.
Kekinos
2xLP repress incoming... including ALL the tracks from CD version
shustrik
damn might buy it just for in mcdonalds... what a great track
Winail
Where does one buy this other than Bleep? In the US so would prefer to skip long shipping delays
Yramede
I have it, I got one of the first 50 copies too so got the album art screen print with it too, there's no 2016 edition catalogued on here though.
Anasius
such a raw record
Taun
When I first got this album when it came out I never thought I'd stop listening to it. Obviously, I have and hardly ever listen to it today. For some reason it hasn't quite lasted as some other great albums (e.g Blue Lines mentioned below), but part of that I think is that it is an album that only real works when its dark, raining and you are on a bus passing through London. What was so great about this album was the way it captured London of the 90s and transported it into the mid 2000s with a sound that was very fresh and (then) unique. It was both fresh and nostalgic. If anyone asked to tell them what London sounded like I'd refer them to this album.
Gldasiy
is there a way to distinguish the original 2007 LP from the repress?
Arcanefist
They seem to have different etchings on the records, thats a sure way.
Nahn
Any images of the limited edition insert?
FireWater
I just would like to know why the hell it was decided (Hyperdub? Domino?) not to print some "necessary" tunes on vinyl (I'm talking about the "short pieces" In McDonalds & Dog Shelter) since there's enough physical space available on wax (eg. the end of sides A & B). I mean, look at it!I can partially understand the choice to leave apart Ghost Hardware for a separate dj-friendly release etc, but seriously, this puzzled me.Hope someone out there will realize it, go behind and make availabe on vinyl those short pieces and some other lost tunes like Fostercare!I can't content myself with mp3, and sorry if it sounds as a vent of frustration rather than a review. This album is fundamental.
Haal
Weelll, pretty sure I'm not supposed to do this, but since you asked I'll break the rules this one time. Here's the Boomkat link: https://boomkat.com/products/burial-updated-edition . The link for Untrue is right there at the bottom too. I'm on their mailing list, so I got an email with a big header about "UPDATED BURIAL RECORDS" with a whole description about how these versions include the ambient tracks that were always missing from the other vinyl versions. Says they're 180s in the description too. So happy day!
Ylonean
Where is it for sale? Any details about the pressing?
Gelgen
Your wish has been granted! The repress with the missing tracks is up for sale now!
Vudomuro
I have sent Hyperdub many nasty emails complaining about the missing tunes from this release.
Unirtay
Buying burial on vinyl seems counter-intuitive to me... I mean he made the whole thing in a program similar to Audacity I believe, with shitty 160kbps samples on a broken laptop! (this could have been his first album but pretty sure it's everything of his).I'm not saying the sound quality put into the album is an issue, it's part of what gives it it's magic. But I can't see how buying the record is really going to bring out the magic of the album further than a 320 mp3??
Kashicage
Agreed. I'm paraphrasing/stealing something I once read about the vinyl release of William Basinski's Disintegration Loops, but there's something poetic about listening to an album that's so fundamentally based on worn-out and broken-down sound samples on a medium that's susceptible to those same natural flaws. It might apply more to The Disintegration Loops, but it's almost like every worn groove, popping scratch, and picked up dust particle is your unique and natural contribution to the album's broken-down aesthetic. I love it (clearly).
SadLendy
I think it enhances the experience, actually.The album already has a broken down, dusty record feeling and sound to it, but actually listening to it on vinyl enhances the experience.It's not for sound quality sake, but experiential sake.
Impala Frozen
i wish i could get this album. the track starts and you immediately think, yes that can build up to something awesome. but it doesn't build up. it stays there. it somehow manages not to get annoying though. maybe that's an achievement.
Brightcaster
Haha I think he means he doesn't like the music, not that he can't physically obtain it.
Hatе&love
just got repressed mate get it while it lasts!
Axebourne
When i first listened to this album it sounded a bit strange and with comercial vocal songs, but after listening to this Album several times i end up loving it, most of the musics are very satisfying, very emotional, evoking wide open spaces filled with giant historical buildings and with people going about their business.My favourite tracks are "Endorphin", "etched headplate", "In Mc Donalds" and "Dog Shelter", they are very melodic, melancholic and emotional. "Homeless" is the less satisfying music for me.This is the best Album by Burial. Hope there is more Burial Albums to come.
Gavidor
I've been meaning to write this review for ages. There's something about Burial's music that really hits the spot emotionally for me and especially this album as the whole thing just fitted exactly in to what was going on in my life at the time when it was released. From the opening of Archangel with it's beautiful vocal cut ups and mournful strings through the next couple of tracks which sound like pure break up tinged bitterness. This album definitely helped me through that time as alongside the tracks which speak about the harder things in relationships there are also rays of sun in the form of the ambient pieces like In Mcdonalds, Dog Shelter and UK. There's something neither awake nor asleep about those tunes, definitely captures the feeling of staying awake for over 24 hours after going out raving. Falling asleep in the back garden with tunes playing after a free party or taking absolutely ages to do a simple task like getting some shopping in as you keep forgetting what you're in there for. Brilliantly emotive stuff that uses all of it's samples and musical elements perfectly.
Nalmetus
As you can tell by the description, this pressing is mislabeled. The LP pressing of this album is also missing four tracks that are included on the CD. If you're thinking about purchasing Burial's Untrue, I strongly suggest that you get the CD version rather than the vinyl version.Just trying to help out potential buyers :)
Musical Aura Island
they also rearrange the track order a bit. so that could provide an alternate listen. I'm gonna make a playlist of the LP track order and see how cohesive it sounds
Jack
This album probably has more in common with downtempo, IDM, or trip-hop than dubstep, per se. In any case, its one of the most talked about releases of the 2000s, and for good reason. "Archangel" is the crown jewel of the album, but each song is great in its own right. If there's a single criticism to be had, it would be that the album is too homogeneous and is lacking in variety. Nonetheless, it's one of the defining releases of the past decade and a testament to the power of the modern music album. 2012 has arrived and this record is still in the top 10 most sold here on Discogs.
Topmen
Whatever genre people are calling this album, I'm going to stick to electronic as a base simplification for Untrue. Its an alright album, but it is not going to save any electronic genre from anything. The beats are one dimensional and thin sounding, there are no two tracks on this album that are outstanding. Maybe a generation of mp3 kids with attention deficit disorder think this is "wicked" because they've been force fed a short lifetime of rubbish pop music and they don't have the balls to break from their pack mentality to explore outside of there cliques to find truly ground breaking electronic music. This is an alright album at best, but not the best produced album of whatever genre people are calling this, but he has time on his side and the future will prove if he has the talent.
Efmprof
Despite being oft-labeled as the 'godfather' of dubstep, I think Burial's UNTRUE excels not necessarily as a dubstep album, but as a creation of pure atmosphere: the strings and vocal samples of "Archangel" hint at dark clouds covering a dark sky, and if "Near Dark" and "Ghost Hardware" don't differ greatly, they both maintain an ominous -- but also strangely romantic -- feel. Indeed, all over the album, the repurposed soul vocal samples help cast the darkness in cement. Stripped of context, the voices become singular howls of pain, or plaintive calls in the empty spaces that Burial's music creates, becoming another texture: "Etched Headplate" resists having the 'lyrics' be understandable, consumed as they are beneath the bass, while the momentary piano of "In McDonalds" echoes the female whisper. The title track, too, hinges on the darkness of telling lies, as brief as that sample is. The sweeping synths and bell tones of the ambient "Dog Shelter" resonate into the more energetic "Homeless," as the layered voices become a chorus. The final track, "Raver," goes between the spareness of the rhythm and the fullness of sound. Forget dubstep being all about the wobbly bass -- here, it's all about the atmosphere.
Ramsey`s
A very nice sounding album. Personaly i dont think it has anything to do with dubstep... It doenst have the basses, the wobbles and build-up. I wouldnt know how to call it in terms of genre? Maybe somewhat loungy. But its a magnificant piece of music. Geniously made!!!!
Steel balls
On the strength of these reviews I bought this album. And even after repeated listenings it somehow does not succeed in revealing its beauty or strength. I agree an eerie atmosphere is being generated, and I would be happy with that, the rhythms are subdued, but not stereotypical. It is the vocal noodlings as the top layer I find annoying. They are too much of a bow to exactly those melismatic r'n'b mannerisms that my ears and my brain shun as the acoustic equivalent of fake emotions: too explicit to be true.This is meant to articulate a different opinion in this sea of almost unanimous appraisal. An afterthought: The enormous amount of five star ratings (even in the context of discogs being a geography visited by people very much inclined towards electronic music) surprises me. Once you bestow your five stars upon Untrue what can you do if suddenly pressed to evaluate Broke Down Engine by Blind Willie McTell?
Balhala
I feel what you mean, but my take on that it's as if the producer is expressing himself through samples because he can't / doesn't dare to express them himself. Almost as if the producer cannot speak. Even when the sample comes off "untrue" (pun intended) it is because he couldn't find the words he want to say in "true" samples. This makes it even more sad combined with the atmosphere on the record. (Perhaps my imagination is too wild)
Bukus
sure, similar vocal sampling was done going back thru oldskool/hardcore, but even further back into early hip hop, disco-funk, & post disco. off-key samples were more common in the past but almost always due to poor sampling. pitching a sample high up or down isn't the issue for me, personally - it's where & how often it's used, where it's placed, choice of sample, & if it's properly tuned. on Kindred, the vocals do sound clean though. the noise & crackling are part of the soundscape textures behind the vocals. at times his sampling sounds great - i.e. "Ashtray Wasp" & "Loner". this is the best release i've heard from him actually. i'm loving it.
Anayajurus
The forced and obvious aspect of the vocal samples is a deliberate aesthetic running across the entire Hardcore Continuum (read Simon Reynolds on the subject of that) from early electro, house, hardcore right up through to the current permutation of dubstep, the 'UK Bass' sound. It's not supposed to sound real, polished or clean, the sample-feel of it is a deliberate aesthetic that, to me, sounds amazeballs. His sound gets more and more degraded, if you check his recent Kindred EP there is lots of crackle and dropouts in the recording which is deliberate. I love it.
Rexfire
Regarding this comment: "The enormous amount of five star ratings (even in the context of discogs being a geography visited by people very much inclined towards electronic music) surprises me."I suggest to the poster and other readers to consider this context as an explanation: Think aobut Burial's close association with dubstep: a genre created by, identified with, and loved a generation of young fans. Dubstep has a strong attraction partly based upon its rhythmical originality and relative independence from other dance-orientated genres, in much the same way as jungle/drum n bass did in the 90s. However, I think the primary cause of dubstep's attraction is the amount of media coverage it's received -from the BBC to Facebook groups- which associate it with progressive, youthful and fashionable innovation.So, remembering how Burial is deeply associated with dubstep, compare the dull majority of dubstep releases with Burial. In this context, Burial's music manifests itself as angelic manna from heaven.Thus the high ratings are explained!
Taur
i do respect this opinion, but gotta admit it somewhat baffles me. the vocals always seemed like the point to me. they remind of older garage and house records, and simpler happier times of being young and going out. i do happen to enjoy listening to r&b though, so my musical tastes may already be skewed from the outset
Vispel
i like Burial's stuff - though i love the individual parts more than i do the whole. i agree that sometimes his vocal samples are both extraneous and a bit annoying - the main reasons being when they're off key and when the same sample is pitched up one octave or so and then down an octave or so. then they sound forced in there. there are some times though when they fit really well. i think Synkro does a much better job of using vocal samples in a similar way where they sound like they were recorded just for the track b/c they fit & flow so perfectly.
Doukree
I'm really digging this album. I have heard a couple of tracks from Burial before but not many and then I received this album and instantly listened to the whole thing and it is definitely something different if you listen to a lot of newer electronic type music. I see this as something to just kick back to and listen to it, you can appreciate it a lot more that way. This will be in my collection for all of time as you would be a fool to sell this.
Quamar
If you enjoy modern electronic music this is something for the holy grail. Untrue isn't so "untrue", as matter of fact it is one of the most true to heart albums I own. Expect nothing but appreciate everything, the sad yet profound exist in this sound, something I could only categorize as revolutionary.
Thofyn
I think what Burial has done here are threefold: 1. He's made an album which authentically captures the wide emotional spectrum of the original hardcore rave era 2. He's used original sounding beats, sounds and processes that instantly identify his music 3. He obviously is a proper musician as the songs on this album have a musical content way above what you normally expect from the electronic scene. Overall, very refreshing in the face of the usual spiritless fodder we've been served this decade. Long live music like this!
Doukasa
I'm just interested. Do you break everything you love into three easy pieces. Perhaps this is your analysis of your girlfriend:I think what she has done here are threefold:1. She was good in bed.2. She made me a nice sandwich (bit of Micky Flannigan there)3. She doesn't complain when I fart.Overall, very refreshing in the face of the usual women I've encountered this decade. Long live birds like her!
Agantrius
This is an unbelievably good album. I think it's the best dubstep album ever produced. It took me a good year to realize how good it is, not wanting to really listen to the R`n`B vocals that Burial samples. However, I found myself returning again and again to this masterpiece and it has really settled deep into me. The music is intense and full of emotion. Untrue starts off very vulnerable with beautiful vocals in Archangel and Near Dark. It gets very dark further on in Etched Headplate and it manages to emerge from the experience with a sense of hope and relief in Raver. The way Burial cuts up the sound in the European radio waves and transforms it into his own vision of what night and loneliness feels like is pure genius. It's like he holds a mirror to our culture and lets us hear what he hears. For me there is no better music that illustrates city life than this.
Zulkishicage
This album is as important to the UK electronic music scene as those from Aphex Twin, Plaid, Black Dog, FSOL, Boards of Canada etc. No doubt it will be held in such esteem as Massive Attack's Blue Lines or Roni Size's New Forms as being one that defines a homegrown genre. The haunting pads and synths compliment the vocals perfectly sounding like an MK / Todd Edwards hybrid battling with hoodies in a studio somewhere. Whether it's hype or not this is a great great album - I've listened to it once and it's already up there as being influential. Whether Burial wins the Mercury prize is neither here nor there - on the one hand new exciting music such as this should be supported to every level so Burial should win the £75,000 or whatever it is... on the other hand... I selfishly don't want the masses to discover this gem. Disregard my last comment... everyone who has more than an interest in electronic music should check this.
Dark_Sun
This is one of the most unique sounding records of the decade. Somewhat less bleak than the first burial record, but with the same layer of white noise over it which adds a surreal warmth, even though the record is still pretty dark. There's a huge sense of that late night calm/isolation, mixed with 2-step/garage/dubstep beats. Some interesting old style rave vocals that have been pitch change processed to death. Apparently this record was made without a sequencer, and it is believable as there is this sense of nervous liveness to the tracks, it steps away from that rigid and perfectly structured sound that you often get with sequenced music. Quite incredible.
Vaua
Burial-Burial was one of the most well-received debuts of the past few years, seemingly effortlessly dubstep was put on the map (again), numerous ears were left anxious for more. Early november 2007 Burial releases a second album: ‘Untrue’, a worthy follow-up - continuing in the same gritty and melancholic style. What makes burial so neat is that his sound is raw - unpolished. sometimes almost cacophonic, chockfull of bass and sock-rocking, The samples Burial uses are inspiring and make one curious for what is next. Not everything on ‘Untrue’ is a retake of the old recipe, Burial manages to bring a bit more warmth and glee to this album - with sometimes even a hint of sunshine, he achieves this by focussing more on (sampled) vocals, understanding the words is something for a trained and patient listener, but the whole is a lovely package that deserves to be played over and over, a good reason to try that old repeat button.
Iraraeal
I'd heard ALOT of amazing things about this album for months, then I actually got it and listened to it. Totally over-rated. I was genuinely bored out of my mind with 85% of this album. There were a few tracks here and there that made my ears perk up for a few seconds. It didn't bore me as if I have ADHD or anything like that (I'm quite the ambient/downtempo/musique-concrete fan), but this just seemed kind of un-inspired and formulaic. I can appreciate the production skills here. It's put together well. But it just bored me, what can I say?
Memuro
As with the first album, there was a lot of hype and conjecture about this album, even before it was released. The debut album was rightfully praised by critics across the board, so all eyes were on Burial to see how he could follow it up. To be fair, Burial does a great job of promoting himself, whether he realises it or not. In a recent interview, he said this album took about 2 weeks to finish, yet I seem to remember the track "Endorphin" was uploaded onto his myspace page months previous... Regardless of this, the music itself is very strong, taking all the hallmarks of his last album and developing on them to make a record which is powerful yet accessible. There are a lot more vocals on this record, but due to the way they are implemented (pitch shifted, doused in reverb, delayed etc..) they add a ghostly, ethereal quality to the already heavily atmospheric Burial sound. Once again, production-wise, he seems to have stuck to his near-legendary wave editor/sample approach. A few of the samples I seem to recognise (I think that deep vocal sound used in "Near Dark" and "Homeless" is lifted from the classic deep house/garage track "We Life Our Hands In The Sanctuary" by DJ Oji & DJ Una) Some of the horns and strings have been carried over from the first album too. Most remarkable of all is how he managed to turn the god awful by-the-numbers R'n'B failure "One Wish" by Ray J into something as astonishing as Archangel. Truly a feat in itself. For the most part, the source material is edited and manipulated to the point where it becomes a ghost of its original self. Like in his first album, there are ambient interludes in this, which I feel are easily as strong as the "proper" tracks. "Dog Shelter" in particular is quite beautiful. I'd love to hear him do a full-length album of these kind of tracks one day. As for negative criticisms, they are few and far between. It took me a long time to get past the cheese of "Etched Headplate" which still reminds me of something a chav would play at the back of the bus on his or her mobile phone. But it is slowly growing on me. I'm not entirely convinced by "Homeless" either, which is probably the weakest track on the album. The vocals just don't work in the context Burial gave them and it recycles far too many sounds from both his previous work and samples used on this album. It does however have a great breakdown about 2:40 into the track, which I wish was developed further. As a previous reviewer mentioned, it isn't the complete paradigm shift in electronic music, which some journalists would have you believe. It is however a deeply enjoyable 50 minutes of music. Like the first album, it is better suited for home/car listening than the dancefloor and if you let it, the music is sure to touch the heart.
TheMoonix
Hey there, can you please tell me what part you of both songs contains the sample of "We Lift Our Hands At The Sanctuary"? It would be a massive help, thank you!
Geny
actually scratch that, i now love the whole album...definitely something that only gets better the more you listen to it :D
Onoxyleili
BriskAs with the first album, there was a lot of hype and conjecture about this album, even before it was released. The debut album was rightfully praised by critics across the board, so all eyes were on Burial to see how he could follow it up. To be fair, Burial does a great job of promoting himself, whether he realises it or not. In a recent interview, he said this album took about 2 weeks to finish, yet I seem to remember the track "Endorphin" was uploaded onto his myspace page months previous... Regardless of this, the music itself is very strong, taking all the hallmarks of his last album and developing on them to make a record which is powerful yet accessible. There are a lot more vocals on this record, but due to the way they are implemented (pitch shifted, doused in reverb, delayed etc..) they add a ghostly, ethereal quality to the already heavily atmospheric Burial sound. Once again, production-wise, he seems to have stuck to his near-legendary wave editor/sample approach. A few of the samples I seem to recognise (I think that deep vocal sound used in "Near Dark" and "Homeless" is lifted from the classic deep house/garage track "We Life Our Hands In The Sanctuary" by DJ Oji & DJ Una) Some of the horns and strings have been carried over from the first album too. Most remarkable of all is how he managed to turn the god awful by-the-numbers R'n'B failure "One Wish" by Ray J into something as astonishing as Archangel. Truly a feat in itself. For the most part, the source material is edited and manipulated to the point where it becomes a ghost of its original self. Like in his first album, there are ambient interludes in this, which I feel are easily as strong as the "proper" tracks. "Dog Shelter" in particular is quite beautiful. I'd love to hear him do a full-length album of these kind of tracks one day.As for negative criticisms, they are few and far between. It took me a long time to get past the cheese of "Etched Headplate" which still reminds me of something a chav would play at the back of the bus on his or her mobile phone. But it is slowly growing on me. I'm not entirely convinced by "Homeless" either, which is probably the weakest track on the album. The vocals just don't work in the context Burial gave them and it recycles far too many sounds from both his previous work and samples used on this album. It does however have a great breakdown about 2:40 into the track, which I wish was developed further.As a previous reviewer mentioned, it isn't the complete paradigm shift in electronic music, which some journalists would have you believe. It is however a deeply enjoyable 50 minutes of music. Like the first album, it is better suited for home/car listening than the dancefloor and if you let it, the music is sure to touch the heart.completely agree...i can never get my head round etched headplate, i love the use of vocals on this album, but prefer it when they're used sparingly
Garne
completely agree...i can never get my head round etched headplate, i love the use of vocals on this album, but prefer it when they're used sparingly
Doomblade
I've been trying all afternoon to determine if the hiss on my copy is due to the defect mentioned above or that it's just part of the music. I think I like it anyway. It's a great album in all. Heard people complain about the vocals making it too poppy, but it doesn't bother me too much. The tracks sound more like songs, but they still have the good elements that made Burial's debut a classic. A worthy follow up and a nice addition to the first album anyway.
Trash
Is it possible to do justice to this album? Truly an awesome piece of music that manages to be emotive, exciting, mellow, dark and melancholic (in true Burial style) all at once. Near Dark is simply stunning, woodblocks, dark rave stabs running around in the back, and a vox admitting to envy. Archangel has elements not unlike Rhythm and Sound, but nothing like them, too. More darkness and vox. The entire album is the work of a genius. I didn't think it would be possible to top South London Boroughs; so, eh, what do I know?
catterpillar
Well I love this album, but I do think people are over-praising it. Its a good album, but its nothing that we haven't heard before. The first thing you'll notice is the amount of vocals Burial uses on this one. Personally I think all the vocals take away from the magic that the first album had. I remember getting excited hearing "Distant Lights" and "U Hurt Me" because they stood out from other tracks due to the vocals. For Untrue, its rather hard for me to pick out any standouts because they all blend in too much now. Despite my petty complaints, the album IS good and if you're a dubstep or Burial fan then you'll no doubt enjoy this one. I have to admit that Archangel is extremely catchy with it's "loving you" lyric.
Olma
I'm going to come out and flat out say that I don't buy for a single fucking second, all of the hyperbolic statements that are being made by glowing music fanatics, blog posters and assorted ilk that claim this to be the next generation of everything that is electronic music. That we are going to be looking back years from now on this landmark of a record that redefined what it means to be an electronic musician. Honestly, the thought of people actually spewing this sort of drawl from their mouths makes me want to give up entirely and weep for any sort of dignity the online music world has left. These people and their excessive and mind numbingly effective hype that helps one artists career while subsequently killing ten others. So no, this is not the second coming of Christ. It's not revolutionary. It's not as if there's no more room to explore in the electronic music world and that Burial is the only person to have done this. Frankly if Burial is all we have for the additional thousands of other new avenues we can explore, then I'd be a bit disappointed. Especially considering that he firmly roots himself within the framework of Dubstep. But you know, I feel that it's a good album. I might venture to say it's great. My gripes (and I do have gripes) are for the most part comfortably outweighed by my enjoyment and perception of the album. Sure his use of vocal pitch shifting to align musical keys makes me want to smash my head into a brick wall, but taken as a whole this album is a great example of someone existing and working wonderfully well within the area of music he finds himself in, something I had thought of with his previous album as well. This album may not be a revolutionary leap by any stretch of the word, and I may decry those who say such ridiculous things, but it's a certain step in the right direction. I'd be lying if I didn't think this hit the mark in many areas, and for this I would call it one of the better electronic albums released this year.
Clonanau
There is so much hype and mystery about Burial. It's impossible to figure if this is just brilliant marketing, and it definitely is that, or whether Burial wants to be a normal person in real life and just get his, or her, music out there. Whatever the truth is, this is a major, singular slab of audacious genius. This is original, and so little can be labeled as such. Broken dub beats that meander and go nowhere in particular, skittering distorted weather field recording sounds, ghostly chanting, Boards Of Canada-style prettiness, skattered piano fragments and deep, very deep bass lines all compete with each other, and complement the overall overpowering effect.
Thorgaginn
Firstly I’d like to say that I’m VERY new to this Dubstep genre, so I’ll base my review on my musical knowledge thus far & my feelings summed upon listening to this seminal album. Found accidentally as I was referred by a friend late Friday night (perfectly timed). I was aghast at the very sound of this album. The gritty, crunchy sounds that eminate so well. Also how it encompasses late night loneliness as well as conjure up ‘burned in’ memories of nights back from bars in London, with friends in the past. Summoning thoughts of lost opportunities, as well as found ones. It’s clear that if ever Dubstep needed a voice of it’s prowess on the scene in the new millennium. It being that 'Can it stand on its own two feet?' This really clarifies that statement. Almost as if it’s UK Rave, Garage heard on a broken Radio ‘post holocaust’. A person looking onward, out their rain battered window, pondering on memories past & present, crystallised with the pain of loneliness. Of course, despite it’s dark, decadent feel, there’s another feel of something euphoric & positively uplifting trying to rise up through it‘s grainy canvas. From these words I state, it’s obvious, this evokes strong feelings from me & the words just flow…which is unusual for me. So I say, Burial. Wherever you are. Rise my son. In my opinion: You have truly captured the voice of generations present & past here. Astounding & moving stuff!
Shakagul
Redacted review.